September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
The differential effect of glowing appearance in the glare illusion: evidence from pupillometry
Author Affiliations
  • Yuta Suzuki
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology
  • Tetsuto Minami
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of TechnologyElectronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute, Toyohashi University of Technology
  • Bruno Laeng
    Department of Psychology, University of Oslo
  • Shigeki Nakauchi
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 876. doi:10.1167/18.10.876
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      Yuta Suzuki, Tetsuto Minami, Bruno Laeng, Shigeki Nakauchi; The differential effect of glowing appearance in the glare illusion: evidence from pupillometry. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):876. doi: 10.1167/18.10.876.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The glare illusion is a pictorial representation where one perceives self-luminosity in the absence of physical luminance. Several pupillometry studies have investigated such illusory brightness enhancement in terms of automatic, physiological, responses and shown that the enhanced brightness perception can be reflected in pupil constrictions to the illusory light, despite there is no corresponding physical luminance change. However, an illusory brightness enhancement occurs also with ''white'' or "gray'' patches in the central region of the glare illusion and not only in the perceptual mode of ''self-luminosity'' (Tamura et al., 2017). Thus, we aimed to explore what factor contributes to the pupil constriction according to these two aspects of illusory perception with a pupillometry experiment where participants observed either as a colored glare illusion, which had color-inducer in the peripheral gradient region, or as a control condition which inverted the gradients, so as to manipulate the perceived brightness while keeping equiluminance across conditions (Experiment1a). We confirmed the presence of brightness enhancement, dependent on the color-inducer, using a method of adjustment (Experiment1b). Although the amount of pupil constriction was significantly correlated with the perceived brightness in each colored glare illusion, the differences in pupil constrictions between glare and control stimuli were similar across the color conditions (n=16). Subsequently, we also conducted an experiment probing the level of luminosity perception, by using glare illusions with varied angle of the gradients to affect the participants' perceptual mode from 'white' to 'luminous' (Experiment2). The results showed that pupillary constriction was increased only when the participants reported a feeling of luminosity from the glare illusion (n=13). These findings suggest that although the pupillary constriction indeed reflects enhanced brightness of the glare illusion, it does also reflect a perceptual mode of luminosity.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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