September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
MEG and fMRI dynamics during movie viewing
Author Affiliations
  • Kaisu Lankinen
    Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland Aalto NeuroImaging (AMI Centre and MEG Core), Aalto University, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
  • Jukka Saari
    Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
  • Yevhen Hlushchuk
    Department of Film, Television and Scenography, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16500, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland Department of Radiology, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS), HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • Pia Tikka
    Department of Film, Television and Scenography, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16500, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
  • Lauri Parkkonen
    Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
  • Riitta Hari
    Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland Department of Art, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, P.O. Box 31000, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
  • Miika Koskinen
    Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 63, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 965. doi:10.1167/18.10.965
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      Kaisu Lankinen, Jukka Saari, Yevhen Hlushchuk, Pia Tikka, Lauri Parkkonen, Riitta Hari, Miika Koskinen; MEG and fMRI dynamics during movie viewing. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):965. doi: 10.1167/18.10.965.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Movies, mimicking dynamic visual scenes experienced in our everyday life, provide a useful tool to study brain processes related to natural viewing. Despite the apparent complexity of the movie stimuli, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies have shown that movies can generate consistent brain activity across viewers. However, little is known about the similarities and differences of hemodynamic and electromagnetic brain dynamics during such natural viewing. We compared MEG and fMRI dynamics in eight subjects who viewed a 15-min black-and-white movie ("At Land" by Maya Deren, 1944) twice during 3-T fMRI and twice during 306-channel MEG recordings. We calculated voxel-wise intra- and intersubject correlations within each imaging modality as well as the correlation between MEG envelopes and fMRI signals. The fMRI signals showed intra- and intersubject correlations up to r = 0.66 and 0.37, respectively, whereas correlations were weaker for the envelopes of band-pass filtered (7 frequency bands within 0.03–100 Hz) MEG signals (intrasubject correlation r < 0.14 and intersubject correlation r < 0.05). Both for fMRI and MEG, the strongest intra- and intersubject correlations took place in occipital areas. Although direct MEG–fMRI voxel-wise correlations were unreliable, MCCA-based spatial-filtering of the MEG data uncovered signal components with intersubject correlations up to r = 0.25. Furthermore, the envelopes of these MEG components below 11 Hz showed statistically significant association with fMRI signals in a general linear model (GLM). Similarities between envelopes of MEG signals and fMRI voxel time-courses were seen mostly in occipital, but also in temporal and frontal brain regions. The results show that the most consistent brain activity across movie viewers occurred in early visual areas, but the association between hemodynamic and electromagnetic activity extended also to higher-order brain areas.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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