September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Top-down attention in the face-processing network: an MRI-guided MEG study using multiple simultaneous frequency tags
Author Affiliations
  • Daniel Baldauf
    Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CIMeC), University of Trento, Italy
  • Eelke de Vries
    Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CIMeC), University of Trento, Italy
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 1237. doi:10.1167/18.10.1237
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Daniel Baldauf, Eelke de Vries; Top-down attention in the face-processing network: an MRI-guided MEG study using multiple simultaneous frequency tags. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):1237. doi: 10.1167/18.10.1237.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) using a frequency-tagging paradigm with compound face stimuli that allowed for independently frequency-tagging various parts of a face (eyes, mouth) as well as changes in facial identity. Our MRI-guided MEG analyses revealed that different sub-nodes of the human face-processing network were tagged differentially according to their functional specialization. Whereas the occipital face area (OFA) was most responsive to the frequency, at which face parts (e.g., the mouth) changed, the fusiform face area (FFA) was selectively entrained by the rhythmic updating of facial identity. Face patches in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) were mostly entrained by rhythmic changes in the eyes region. Furthermore, top-down attention to the mouth, eyes, or identity of the face selectively modulated the neural processing in the respective area (i.e., OFA, STS, or FFA, respectively), closely resembling behavioral cue validity effects observed in the participants' reaction time and detection rate data. Our results allow new insights in the hierarchical organization of the occipital face processing network and the flow of information among its components. Further, our results illuminate how top-down attention biases the visual processing of different aspects and dimensions within a single face-object, at various stages of the involved visual processing hierarchy.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×