September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
The Impact of Performance-Based Pay and Competition on Rare Target Search Performance
Author Affiliations
  • Eric Chantland
    Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
  • Mark Becker
    Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 1251. doi:10.1167/18.10.1251
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Eric Chantland, Mark Becker; The Impact of Performance-Based Pay and Competition on Rare Target Search Performance. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):1251. doi: 10.1167/18.10.1251.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

When performing a visual search for rare targets, people are quick to respond target absent - indicative of a lower "quitting threshold." As a result, they often miss rare targets - the low-prevalence effect. This finding may have important implications for consequential real-world searches with rare targets (e.g., baggage and cancer screening). As a result, there have been many attempts to modify rare target search tasks to improve target detection. For the most part, these attempts have failed to increase hit rates or increases in hit rates have been accompanied by increases in false alarms– a sign of a change in decision criterion rather than sensitivity. Here we investigate whether two techniques designed to increase motivation would increase rare target search performance. In a 2 x 2 between subjects design we manipulated performance-based pay and competition with another participant. When participants competed against another participant (competing "for sport" or for monetary reward) hit rates increased (without an increase in false alarm rates) and target absent reaction times slowed (indicative of higher quitting thresholds). Performance-based pay did not improve search. In sum, having searchers compete may improve rare target search, even when the competition is simply for "bragging rights."

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×