September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Tool identity and subsequent use affects the kinematics of grasping movements
Author Affiliations
  • Diana Tonin
    School of Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  • Ralph Pawling
    School of Natural Sciences & Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
  • Katrina Leyden
    School of Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  • Fraser Smith
    School of Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  • Stephanie Rossit
    School of Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 1265. doi:10.1167/18.10.1265
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Diana Tonin, Ralph Pawling, Katrina Leyden, Fraser Smith, Stephanie Rossit; Tool identity and subsequent use affects the kinematics of grasping movements. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):1265. doi: 10.1167/18.10.1265.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Tools are manipulable objects that, unlike other objects in the world (e.g., buildings), afford specific action procedures closely linked to object identity. Several studies have shown that differences between structural (e.g., spoon handle size, shape and orientation) and learned functional (e.g., stir, poor or feed) properties of tools can translate to distinct motor affordances. Most studies to date however have used pictures instead of real tools and measured reaction times rather than hand movement kinematics. To investigate how tool identity and subsequent use affect grasping kinematics 18 participants performed two grasping tasks with their right-hand: 1) grasp-to-use (GTU), where participants grasped a tool to demonstrate its typical use; and 2) grasp-to-move (GTM) where participants grasped a tool to move it from one location to another. Critically, participants grasped real 3D familiar kitchen tools with the same handle, so that any kinematic effects could not be simply due to the structural differences between tool handles. Moreover, to control for differences between GTU and GTM kinematics we only analysed the first portion of the movement (i.e., grasping the handle), as this was identical between tasks and tools. We found that participants presented larger grip apertures for the GTU than the GTM tasks, which may reflect differences in the kinematics of subsequent actions following the handle grasp. Moreover, for both tasks participants presented larger grip apertures for tools that had larger tool heads (e.g., whisk) compared to tools with smaller tool heads (e.g., knife), even though the tool handle that was grasped was of identical size across tools. These results indicate that tool identity plays a critical role in action planning and execution.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×