September 2018
Volume 18, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2018
Detecting motion-changes with peripheral vision: On the superiority of fixating over tracking.
Author Affiliations
  • Christian Vater
    University of Bern, Institute of Sport Science
  • Andre Klostermann
    University of Bern, Institute of Sport Science
  • Ernst-Joachim Hossner
    University of Bern, Institute of Sport Science
Journal of Vision September 2018, Vol.18, 1277. doi:10.1167/18.10.1277
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      Christian Vater, Andre Klostermann, Ernst-Joachim Hossner; Detecting motion-changes with peripheral vision: On the superiority of fixating over tracking.. Journal of Vision 2018;18(10):1277. doi: 10.1167/18.10.1277.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Peripheral-motion-change-detection performance was examined by contrasting a fixation with a SPEM condition. To that end, participants were confronted with a visual display consisting of 15 white squares and 1 red square circulating with 6°/s (tracking condition) and stopping in-between (fixation condition). The instruction was to visually follow the red square and to press a button as soon as a white square begins to move. The to-be-detected white square movements varied in eccentricity and speed. A Vicon-integrated eye-tracking system was used for controlling gaze behaviour. Response times (ms) and missed detections (%) were measured as dependent variables. Results in Experiment 1 show faster motion-change detection in fixation vs. tracking condition (401 ms vs. 809 ms) and increased response times as a function of eccentricity in the tracking condition only (4°: 570 ms; 8°: 737 ms; 16°: 1121 ms). Moreover, missed detections were revealed at 16° eccentricity in the tracking condition only. Experiment 2 controlled for foveal load as possible confounder by replacing the red square with a virtual centre evoked by 4 red squares. The same results were obtained as in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3 we tested motion-detections with fixations and SPEM at 9 eccentricities (4-20°). We observed constant response times for fixations over the eccentricities (around 550ms), but during SPEM, response times increased from 4° (701 ms) to 14° (895 ms) to 20° (1433 ms). Missed detections were again only observed at eccentricities of 16° and higher. In sum, it could be shown that SPEM impair the ability to detect peripheral motion changes.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2018

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