September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Impaired egocentric spatial representations by congenital deafness: neural evidence from a multimodality neuroimaging study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hui Li
    Center for Studies of Psychological Application and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510631, China
    Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China
  • Xiaolin Zhou
    Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
  • Qi Chen
    Center for Studies of Psychological Application and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510631, China
    Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 43d. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.43d
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Hui Li, Xiaolin Zhou, Qi Chen; Impaired egocentric spatial representations by congenital deafness: neural evidence from a multimodality neuroimaging study. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):43d. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.43d.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The spatial location of an object can be represented relative to two types of reference frames: allocentric and egocentric. The allocentric reference frame encodes object positions relative to another background object independent of observers’ body effectors while the egocentric reference frame encodes object positions relative to observers’ own body effectors. At the behavioral level, recent evidence from our lab suggested that congenital deafness is associated with significantly impaired (slowed) egocentric judgments, compared to the healthy hearing control group. It remains unclear, however, the neural mechanisms underlying the impaired egocentric judgements after early congenital deafness. Here, we investigated this issue by using structural, functional MRI, and diffusion tensor image (DTI). Behaviorally, we replicated previous behavioral evidence by showing that egocentric judgments were significantly slower than allocentric judgments in the congenitally deaf subjects while were comparable in the healthy hearing controls. At the neural level, compared to the hearing controls, the bilateral medial frontal gyrus in default mode network was specifically activated by the allocentric task, and the left superior parietal gyrus was specifically activated by the egocentric task in the deaf subjects. Structurally, by using T1-weighted MRI and surface-based morphometry of the gray matter, we found that the cortical thickness of the bilateral primary auditory cortex in the Heschl’s gyrus was thicker in the deaf than in the control group. Furthermore, by using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics of the white matter, we found that the mean fractional anisotropy values in the bilateral parietal cortex and the right temporal cortex were significantly reduced in the deaf group, compared to the hearing controls. Taken together, functional and structural neural evidence consistently suggested that the impaired egocentric spatial representations in the congenitally deaf subjects are associated with neural changes in the dorsal visual stream and the auditory cortex.

Acknowledgement: Natural Science Foundation of China grant Number 31871138 to QC 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×