September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Underlying mechanisms of temporal dynamics in bistable perception
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yijun Ge
    Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
  • Ruanyuan Zhang
    Center of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
  • Chencan Qian
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Chen Chen
    Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
  • Juraj Mesik
    Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
  • Stephen Engel
    Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
  • Sheng He
    Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America
    State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 61c. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.61c
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      Yijun Ge, Ruanyuan Zhang, Chencan Qian, Chen Chen, Juraj Mesik, Stephen Engel, Sheng He; Underlying mechanisms of temporal dynamics in bistable perception. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):61c. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.61c.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Individuals differ in how fast they process and interpret input information, make choices, and control movements. In order to uncover underlying factors that produce variability in human brain dynamics across individuals, we measured switching dynamics for four relatively independent bistable perceptual phenomena (Necker Cube, Rotating Cylinder, Translating Diamond, and Biological Motion, based on Cao et al, 2018). In each individual, we also acquired data characterizing their attentional abilities (alerting, orienting, executive control), rates of information accumulation in perceptual decision making, levels of internal noise, perceptual grouping ability, and magnitude of sensory adaptation. Results from 90 participants show that different types of bistable perception are differentially influenced by attentional, noise, and perceptual decision factors. Base on robust factor analysis (Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI)>0.97, RMSEA< 0.05) using the Maximum Likelihood method of extraction, fast switching of point-light biological motion (front vs. back view of walker) was associated with stronger attentional orienting effect as well as better perceptual grouping of contours. Higher intrinsic additive noise and poor executive attentional control are associated with longer periods of ungrouped bars instead of the coherent translating diamond. Interestingly, slower rate of information accumulation in perceptual decision regarding a subjective Kanizsa shape predicts longer periods of perceiving the coherent translating diamond and slower switching of the rotating cylinder from structure-from-motion. Participants with stronger effects of attentional alerting showed faster switching when viewing the Necker cube. Our results provide further support that individual differences in brain dynamics arise from independent differences in dynamics of the supporting brain regions. In addition, intrinsic noise, different aspects of attention are differentially important for the switching dynamics of different bistable phenomena.

Acknowledgement: supported by Engdahl Family Research Fund 
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