September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Similarities in response non-linearities in macaque lateral prefrontal cortex visual neurons during in vivo and in vitro experiments. Implications for normalization models.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julio C Martinez-Trujillo
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Eric S Kuebler
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Michelle Jimenez
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Jackson Blonde
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Kelly Bullock
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Megan Roussy
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Benjamin Corrigan
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Roberto Gulli
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Diego Mendoza-Halliday
    McGovern Institute for Brain Research at M.I.T., USA
  • Santiago Gomez-Torres
    Department of Physiology, McGill University, Canada
  • Stefan Everling
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Julia Sunstrum
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Meagan Wiederman
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Michelle Everest
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Wataru Inoue
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
  • Michael Poulter
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Western University, Canada
    Robarts Research Institute, Western University, Canada
    Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 69d. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.69d
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      Julio C Martinez-Trujillo, Eric S Kuebler, Michelle Jimenez, Jackson Blonde, Kelly Bullock, Megan Roussy, Benjamin Corrigan, Roberto Gulli, Diego Mendoza-Halliday, Santiago Gomez-Torres, Stefan Everling, Julia Sunstrum, Meagan Wiederman, Michelle Everest, Wataru Inoue, Michael Poulter; Similarities in response non-linearities in macaque lateral prefrontal cortex visual neurons during in vivo and in vitro experiments. Implications for normalization models.. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):69d. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.69d.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Visual neurons in many brain areas show non-linear response profiles as a function of the stimulus shown inside their receptive fields. These can be fit with different non-linear functions to obtain the tuning curve of the neuron for a particular feature. One example is the contrast response function, e.g., increases in the contrast of a stimulus inside a neuron’s receptive field produce changes in its response profile that can be fitted by a sigmoid function. Such properties have been attributed to lateral inhibition and normalization within a network of interconnected neurons. Here we test the hypothesis that non-linearities in response functions of single neurons during in vivorecordings can be at least in part attributed to their intrinsic (not network dependent) response properties. To address this issue, we first obtained response functions from single neuron recordings in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC areas 8A/9/46) of two macaques to gratings of varying contrast inside their receptive fields. We then conducted patch clamp in vitrorecordings in slices extracted from the same LPFC area of 4 macaques using square current pulses of varying intensities that attempted to simulate increases in input strength when increasing contrast. In both datasets we convert spikes trains to firing rates over 250ms of stimulus presentation (in vivo) or pulse duration (in vitro) and fit the data with a sigmoid and a linear function. From 27 in vivo neurons, 52% were best fitted by the sigmoid and 48% were best fitted by a line. From 31 in vitro neurons 45% were best fitted by the sigmoid and 55% by a line. The proportions of neurons fitted with either function was not significantly different between areas (p>0.1, Chi-Square test) suggesting that non-linearities in the responses of visual neurons can be explained to a large degree by intrinsic cell properties.

Acknowledgement: CIHR, NSERC, BrainSCAN 
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