September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Does the near/far effect on target detection depend on distance from the observer or from the fixation plane? The case of a simulated driving task with distance indicated by pictorial cues and forward motion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jiali Song
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University
  • Hong-Jin Sun
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University
  • Patrick J. Bennett
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University
  • Allison B. Sekuler
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University
    Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Health Sciences
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 101. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.101
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jiali Song, Hong-Jin Sun, Patrick J. Bennett, Allison B. Sekuler; Does the near/far effect on target detection depend on distance from the observer or from the fixation plane? The case of a simulated driving task with distance indicated by pictorial cues and forward motion. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):101. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.101.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Visual attention is modulated by simulated viewing distance: Where one looks affects how one attends. For example, Song et al. (VSS 2016) reported that targets presented at a close apparent distance are detected more quickly and accurately than targets presented at a far apparent distance, even when the retinal characteristics of the targets were equated across distances. However, in that study, closer objects were always located near the plane of fixation. Therefore, it is unclear whether the “near advantage” was based on fixation-centered or observer-centered coordinates: the detectability of visual targets might decrease as a function of the distance from the plane of fixation or as a function of the distance from the observer. The current study differentiates these two alternatives. We measured the detectability of visual targets presented at two eccentricities (12 & 24 deg) and at three simulated distances (9, 18.5, & 37 m). We induced fixation at a constant distance by asking participants to follow a lead car at a distance of approximately 18.5 virtual meters. Hence, targets could appear at a distance that was shorter than the distance to the lead car, at the same distance as the lead car, or beyond the lead car. Preliminary results (N = 12) showed that, at both eccentricities, target detection was best (i.e., highest accuracy & lowest reaction time) when targets appeared at the same distance as the lead car, providing support for the fixation-centered hypothesis. These results provide further support for the idea that distance, even when simulated, modulates attention, and have potential implications for the development of real-world attention aids, such as heads-up displays.

Acknowledgement: National Science and Engineering Research Council 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×