September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Inducing the use of information for face identification
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Tardif
    Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal
  • Caroline Blais
    Département de Psychoéducation et Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Frédéric Gosselin
    Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 138b. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.138b
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      Jessica Tardif, Caroline Blais, Frédéric Gosselin; Inducing the use of information for face identification. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):138b. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.138b.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Faghel-Soubeyrand et al. (in press) trained observers to use the facial information most correlated with skilled face-sex discrimination — the eye on the right of the face stimulus from the observer’s viewpoint — and showed that these observers’ performance increased more than that of control participants. Here, using a similar implicit induction procedure, we attempted to train observers to use the information associated with skilled — mostly the two eyes— or unskilled face identification (Tardif et al., 2018). First, participants completed 500 Bubbles trials where they were asked to identify a celebrity, to reveal their use of information pre-induction. Second, participants carried out 500 more trials of the Bubbles task, during which, unbeknownst to them, the base face stimuli were tampered with. In the best-information induction subject group, the information related to skilled face identification was made available (N=8; mean age=21.9; 2 women) and, in the worse-information induction subject group, the information related to unskilled face identification was made available (N=7; mean age=21.9; 3 women). Third, and finally, observers completed 500 more Bubbles trials to reveal their use of information post-induction. For each subject group, we computed classification images, showing the visual information used before and after the induction trials. As expected, results show that participants from the worse-information group used the mouth before and after the induction, whereas participants from the best-information group used mainly the mouth before induction and the two eyes after induction (Cluster Test: p< .05; sigma=26; tC=2.70; Sr=21901; Chauvin et al., 2005). We believe this induction procedure shows promise as a mean for individuals specifically impaired in face recognition (e.g. developmental prosopagnosics) and professionals relying on strong face processing (e.g. police officers) to improve their abilities.

Acknowledgement: NSERC 
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