September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Acute stress, either social or physical, alters the priority of salient feared distracters but not neutral salient distracters
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary H MacLean
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Alex P Boone
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Tom Bullock
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Tyler Santander
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Jamie Raymer
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Liann Jimmons
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Alex Stuber
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Gold N Okafor
    Psychology, University of California Berkeley
  • Scott T Grafton
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
    Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Dynamical Neuroscience, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Michael B Miller
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
    Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Dynamical Neuroscience, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Barry Giesbrecht
    Psychological & Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara
    Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California Santa Barbara
    Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Dynamical Neuroscience, University of California Santa Barbara
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 141. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.141
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Mary H MacLean, Alex P Boone, Tom Bullock, Tyler Santander, Jamie Raymer, Liann Jimmons, Alex Stuber, Gold N Okafor, Scott T Grafton, Michael B Miller, Barry Giesbrecht; Acute stress, either social or physical, alters the priority of salient feared distracters but not neutral salient distracters. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):141. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.141.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Stress increases involuntary attention capture by emotional stimuli. It is unclear, however, how the predictability of feared stimuli modulates this effect relative to a neutral stimulus. Participants completed a visual search task that could include feared (spider) or neutral (butterfly) salient distracters following a stress induction and appropriate control intervention. Stress was induced either using the cold pressor test (CPT, n=31) or the Trier Social Stress test (TSST, n=27) prior to the visual search task. Salient distracters captured attention under all conditions, such that reaction times (RT) were slower when a salient distracter was present than when absent. In blocks where the valence of the salient distracter was predictable, but not blocks where either valence was equally likely, there was a three-way interaction between stress state (stress vs. control), valence (feared vs. neutral), and the presence of a salient distracter on RT (F (1,57)=6.74, p=.011, η2=.11), which did not change as a function of stress type (CPT vs. TSST, p=.777). Neutral distracters captured attention similarly under both the stress and control conditions (present vs. absent, F (1,57) = 57.7, p < .001, η2 = .50; interaction with stress vs. control, p =.577). Capture by feared distracters was influenced by stress (present vs. absent × stress vs. control, F (1,57) = 12.16, p < .001, η2 = .18), such that it was greater under stress than control. However, compared to neutral distracters, capture by a feared distracter was both greater under stress (spider vs. butterfly, MΔ = 25 > 18 ms) and less (MΔ = 11 < 21 ms) under control. These results indicate that stress, either social or physical, not only increases the priority of feared salient stimuli, but also abolishes some protective suppression from the effect of feared salient stimuli present under control conditions when its appearance is predictable.

Acknowledgement: U.S. Army Research Office Grant W911NK-09-0001 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×