September 2019
Volume 19, Issue 10
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2019
Visual cortex connectivity variability in congenitally blind individuals
Author Affiliations
  • Ella Striem-Amit
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
  • Smadar Ovadia-Caro
    Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Ningcong Tong
    Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
  • Xiaoying Wang
    State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
  • Yanchao Bi
    State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
  • Alfonso Caramazza
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
    Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38068 Rovereto, Italy
Journal of Vision September 2019, Vol.19, 159c. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.159c
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      Ella Striem-Amit, Smadar Ovadia-Caro, Ningcong Tong, Xiaoying Wang, Yanchao Bi, Alfonso Caramazza; Visual cortex connectivity variability in congenitally blind individuals. Journal of Vision 2019;19(10):159c. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/19.10.159c.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Visual cortex organization is highly consistent across individuals, despite being driven by both innate and experience-dependent factors. To what degree does this consistency depend on sensory experience? When the visual cortex partly reorganizes as result of blindness, is the resulting pattern more variable across individuals? We tested this question regarding early (retinotopic) visual cortex functional connectivity patterns in people born blind. Functional connectivity data from people born blind shows large-scale preservation of connectivity patterns within the visual cortex which is consistent across individuals. In contrast to the consistency of the connectivity patterns within the visual cortex, we find inter-subject variability in the plasticity patterns resulting from blindness, for connecting visual and non-visual cortices. Variability is found in these pathways’ connectivity not only in the blind, but also across the sighted individuals. These findings suggest that plasticity may operate at unmasking existing variable connectivity patterns in the absence of visual experience. Furthermore, they suggest that the link of such individual differences and variability to behavioral outcomes using different sensory aids and restoration approaches should be tested.

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