October 2020
Volume 20, Issue 11
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   October 2020
Crossmodal metaperception: Visual and tactile confidence share a common scale
Author Affiliations
  • Lena Klever
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
    Center of Mind , Brain, and Behavior (CMBB), University of Marburg and Justus Liebig University Giessen
  • Marie Mosebach
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
  • Katja Fiehler
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
    Center of Mind , Brain, and Behavior (CMBB), University of Marburg and Justus Liebig University Giessen
  • Pascal Mamassian
    Laboratoire des Systemes Perceptifs, CNRS UMR 8248, Paris
    Institut d'Etude de la Cognition, Ecole Normale Superieure, PSL University , Paris
  • Jutta Billino
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
    Center of Mind , Brain, and Behavior (CMBB), University of Marburg and Justus Liebig University Giessen
Journal of Vision October 2020, Vol.20, 1097. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.1097
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      Lena Klever, Marie Mosebach, Katja Fiehler, Pascal Mamassian, Jutta Billino; Crossmodal metaperception: Visual and tactile confidence share a common scale. Journal of Vision 2020;20(11):1097. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.1097.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Perceptual confidence refers to our ability to estimate the validity of our perceptual decision. There is robust evidence that observers have access to a reliable estimate of their own uncertainty when making perceptual decisions. However, so far, evidence is still scarce whether metaperception qualifies as a common mechanism that can monitor decisions across different sensory modalities. In previous work, it has been suggested that perceptual confidence can be evaluated on an abstract scale that is not only task-independent, but also modality-independent. We aimed to scrutinize these findings by measuring visual contrast and tactile vibration discrimination thresholds in a confidence forced-choice task. A total of 26 participants were involved in our study. We determined thresholds for trials in which perceptual judgments were chosen as confident and for those that were declined as confident. Confidence comparisons were made between perceptual decisions either within the visual and tactile modality, respectively, or across both modalities. Furthermore, we assessed executive functions in order to explore a possible link between cognitive control and metaperceptual capacities. We found that perceptual performance was a good predictor of confidence judgments and that the threshold modulation was similarly pronounced in both modalities. Most importantly, participants compared their perceptual confidence across visual and tactile decisions with the same precision as within the same modality. These findings are supported by a Bayesian Repeated Measures ANOVA favouring the null model as the best fitting model. However, we observed substantial variability of confidence sensitivity and executive functions across our participants. We suggest that individual differences in executive functions might provide a critical resource that determines metaperceptual ability. In conclusion, our findings corroborate that perceptual uncertainty can be accessed on an abstract scale and that it can be used to make confidence judgments across sensory modalities.

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