October 2020
Volume 20, Issue 11
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   October 2020
Induced Simultanagnosia in a Saccadic Persistence of Vision Display
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rolf Nelson
    Wheaton College (MA)
  • Jason Goodman
    Wheaton College (MA)
  • Katherine Eskine
    Wheaton College (MA)
  • Augustus Kram Mendelsohn
    Wheaton College (MA)
  • Michael Vallerie
    Wheaton College (MA)
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  Wheaton College
Journal of Vision October 2020, Vol.20, 529. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.529
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      Rolf Nelson, Jason Goodman, Katherine Eskine, Augustus Kram Mendelsohn, Michael Vallerie; Induced Simultanagnosia in a Saccadic Persistence of Vision Display. Journal of Vision 2020;20(11):529. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.529.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

A form of simultanagnosia in visually unimpaired individuals was found for objects presented during saccades. 18 college-age observers were asked to draw their percepts after making saccades across an LED strip that “painted” an image on their retinas by presenting sequential columns of a bitmap at a speed to match a 30 degree saccade. During experimental trials, repetitions of a single letter (either “A”, “X”, “H”, or “V”) were presented across saccades. Although an average of six letters were presented across each saccade, observers nearly always indicated perceiving only a single instance of the letter in their drawings. This inability to perceive multiple instances of a letter was not due to a limited region of attentional processing, as it only attained for multiple instances along the axis of the saccade -- horizontal saccades did not affect perception of multiple letters along the vertical axis. This effect is likely due to known mechanisms of suppression of visual areas during saccades, particularly the medial temporal and inferior pulvinar regions (Berman et al., 2017).

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