October 2020
Volume 20, Issue 11
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   October 2020
Dynamic Representations in Visual Working Memory
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben Park
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Dirk B. Walther
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto
    Samsung Artificial Intelligence Center Toronto
  • Keisuke Fukuda
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  This work was supported by an NSERC Discovery Grant awarded to KF (RGPIN-2017-06866)
Journal of Vision October 2020, Vol.20, 900. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.900
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ben Park, Dirk B. Walther, Keisuke Fukuda; Dynamic Representations in Visual Working Memory. Journal of Vision 2020;20(11):900. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.20.11.900.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Despite people’s subjectively rich visual experiences, the amount of information they can actively represent in their minds at a given time is severely limited by the capacity of visual working memory (VWM). To characterize this cognitive bottleneck, past studies have primarily employed static visual stimuli and, therefore, it is not yet clear how VWM represents dynamically changing visual information. Previous research suggests that VWM might utilize two distinct mechanisms to maintain an active representation of a changing stimulus: When a stimulus goes through a continuous (e.g., gradual) change, VWM keeps up with the change by updating its existing representation of the original stimulus. When a stimulus goes through a discontinuous (e.g., sudden) change, VWM resets its content by first discarding its original representation of the stimulus and then re-encoding a new representation. To test this hypothesis, we measured an electrophysiological correlate of VWM load (the contralateral delay activity or CDA) while participants tracked the characterizing identity (e.g., shape, color) of a dynamically changing stimulus. Here, we predicted that 1) the CDA amplitude remains sustained when a target object goes through a continuous identity change and 2) the CDA amplitude reduces to zero shortly after a target object goes through a discontinuous identity change. Our experiments confirmed both of our hypotheses when the stimulus went through dynamic shape or color changes. Taken together, our findings provide support for the existence of two distinct mechanisms through which VWM keeps track of dynamically changing visual information; updating and resetting.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×