September 2021
Volume 21, Issue 9
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2021
Differential Patterns of Activation and Deactivation among Brain Regions Selective for Face and Scene Processing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vivian T.-Y. Peng
    Department of Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
    PhD Program in Cognitive Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
  • Peter K.-H. Cheng
    PhD Program in Cognitive Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
    Research Center for Education and Mind Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
  • Cody L.-S. Wang
    Department of Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
    PhD Program in Cognitive Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
  • Gary C.-W. Shyi
    Department of Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
    PhD Program in Cognitive Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
  • S.-T. Tina Huang
    Department of Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
    PhD Program in Cognitive Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C.
Journal of Vision September 2021, Vol.21, 2107. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2107
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      Vivian T.-Y. Peng, Peter K.-H. Cheng, Cody L.-S. Wang, Gary C.-W. Shyi, S.-T. Tina Huang; Differential Patterns of Activation and Deactivation among Brain Regions Selective for Face and Scene Processing. Journal of Vision 2021;21(9):2107. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2107.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

During the past decades, a set of brain regions have been identified as the core system for face processing, comprising occipital face area (OFA), fusiform face area (FFA), and posterior region of superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). Analogously, a set of brain regions have been identified as the core system for scene processing, including occipital place area (OPA) (or transverse occipital sulcus, TOS), retrosplenial complex (RSC), and parahippocampal area (PPA). Here we investigated how activities of selective brain regions may be modulated (activated or deactivated) by their preferred versus non-preferred category of stimuli. Twenty-five participants were asked to perform a one-back working memory (WM) task while viewing sequences of face and scene stimuli, with brain images being scanned using the fMRI. In addition, a sequence of object images was used as baseline control. The results showed that positive activations were found for brain regions selective for face processing in contrast to object control, whereas those selective for scene processing exhibited deactivation in contrast to object control, when participants performed the 1-back WM task on faces. In contrast, brain regions selective for scene processing exhibited a pattern of positive activation and those selective for face processing exhibited a pattern of deactivation, when participants performed the 1-back WM task on scenes. These differential patterns of activation and deactivation among brain regions exhibiting category selectivity for face and scene processing are consistent with findings from the previous research. Furthermore, they also collaborate with our recent findings, showing that orienting attention to either the face or scene aspect in processing face-scene compound stimuli may help generate activations in addition to those evoked by images of specific categories. In other words, the additional activation elicited as a result of attentional allocation may be able to counter the deactivation caused by the non-preferred aspect of the compound image.

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