September 2021
Volume 21, Issue 9
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2021
Opposing aftereffects are still measurable after a one-week delay
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria Foglia
    McMaster University, Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour
  • M.D. Rutherford
    McMaster University, Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  This research was funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Canada) grant to MDR.
Journal of Vision September 2021, Vol.21, 2094. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2094
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      Victoria Foglia, M.D. Rutherford; Opposing aftereffects are still measurable after a one-week delay. Journal of Vision 2021;21(9):2094. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2094.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Introduction. Visual adaptation occurs after a sustained exposure to a visual stimulus. Aftereffects form after fixating a variety of visual stimuli, and the duration of the aftereffect varies depending on the visual stimulus (Burton et al., 2016; Leopold et al., 2005; Rhodes et al., 2007; Kloth & Rhodes, 2016; Kloth, & Schweinberger, 2008). The current study tests opposing aftereffects for Christian and Muslim faces 7 days after adaptation. Methods. Thirty-four participants underwent an opposing after effect paradigm. First, participants viewed 48 face pairs, one compressed by 10% and one expanded by 10%, and on each trial selected which face looked more attractive. Next, participants were adapted to Muslim and Christian faces altered by 60%. After adaptation, participants again viewed and selected from the original 48 face pairs. Participants returned 7 days later and viewed and selected from the same 48 face pairs to determine if aftereffects were still measurable. Next, participants were re-adapted to Christian and Muslim faces distorted in the opposite direction and tested to see whether aftereffects could be reversed. Results. Using a mean change score for contracted faces selected from baseline as the dependent variable, there was a significant interaction between adaptation condition and religious face type (F(1, 32)=6.18, p=0.018) 7 days after adaptation. Examining adaptation conditions separately, opposing aftereffects were observed for those who adapted to Christian contracted and Muslim expanded faces, 7 days after adaptation (t(17)=2.98, p= 0.009). Opposing aftereffects could not be reversed by exposure to faces distorted in the opposite direction after 7 days, as no significant interaction between adaptation condition and religious face type was observed (F(1, 32)=2.018, p=0.165). Discussion. Results revealed evidence of opposing aftereffects adaptation persisting for 7 days. Furthermore, the aftereffect could not be reversed 7 days after adaptation.

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