September 2021
Volume 21, Issue 9
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2021
High-Resolution Eye-Tracking during Natural Real-World Interaction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sanjana Kapisthalam
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • zhetou zhao
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • ashley clark
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • Bin Yang
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • janis intoy
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience, Boston University
  • Michele.A. Cox
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • Michele Rucci
    Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
    Center for vision science, University of Rochester
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  This work was supported by Facebook Reality Labs and by National Institutes of Health grants EY018363 (MR) and EY029565 (JI).
Journal of Vision September 2021, Vol.21, 2440. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2440
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      Sanjana Kapisthalam, zhetou zhao, ashley clark, Bin Yang, janis intoy, Michele.A. Cox, Michele Rucci; High-Resolution Eye-Tracking during Natural Real-World Interaction. Journal of Vision 2021;21(9):2440. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2440.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Humans exhibit surprisingly fine control of their eye movements. Numerous recent studies, drawing from a range of visual tasks, have revealed oculomotor precision far superior to what previously assumed (e.g., Intoy & Rucci, Nature Communications, 2020). Because of technical challenges, reliable high-precision measurements have traditionally required strict head immobilization. During natural viewing, however, eye movements co-occur with head movements and both contribute to shape the luminance stream entering the eyes. The need, therefore, emerges for extending high-resolution oculomotor measurements to normal head-free viewing. A well-known exception to the head-immobilization requirement is provided by the seminal work by Steinman and colleagues, who developed a coil-based approach (Revolving Field Monitor; Steinman, 1995) to precisely record eye movements while the head is free to move normally. Building on this pioneering work, here we present a system that integrates a custom scleral coil eye-tracker with a motion capture system to simultaneously track eyes, head, and hand movements with high-precision. Eye-tracking is achieved by means of three, orthogonal, oscillating, magnetic fields, which are continuously tuned to maintain high uniformity in the central 1 m3 region. Voltages induced by the field are collected by coils embedded in silicon annuli placed on the observer’s sclera and on a tightly fitting helmet. A passive motion-capture system, selected to minimally interfere with the magnetic fields, tracks head translations, hand movements, and all rigid objects involved in experiments. The integration of these two systems enables precise localization of the line of sight in the scene and reconstruction of the visual input to the retina. We report measurements of head and eye movements with arc-minute resolution in a variety of everyday tasks such as needle threading, sorting small objects, and reading fine print. Our results confirm a remarkably fine degree of oculomotor control as the observer interacts normally with the scene.

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