September 2021
Volume 21, Issue 9
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2021
The Relationship Between Daytime and Nighttime Stereoacuity
Author Affiliations
  • Chao-Chien Cheng
    International Doctoral Program in Principles and Implications of Mind Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
    Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
    Aviation Physiology Research Laboratory, Kaohsiung Armed Force General Hospital Gangshan Branch, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
  • Chi-Lien Lee
    Aviation Physiology Research Laboratory, Kaohsiung Armed Force General Hospital Gangshan Branch, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
  • Chung-Yu Lai
    Graduate Institute of Aerospace and Undersea Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan
  • Kwo-Tsao Chiang
    Aviation Physiology Research Laboratory, Kaohsiung Armed Force General Hospital Gangshan Branch, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
  • Pi-Chun Huang
    International Doctoral Program in Principles and Implications of Mind Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
    Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
Journal of Vision September 2021, Vol.21, 2333. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2333
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      Chao-Chien Cheng, Chi-Lien Lee, Chung-Yu Lai, Kwo-Tsao Chiang, Pi-Chun Huang; The Relationship Between Daytime and Nighttime Stereoacuity. Journal of Vision 2021;21(9):2333. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.21.9.2333.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Good stereoacuity in a wide range of illumination conditions is important for professionals such as surgeons and pilots. Most stereoacuity measures are conducted in daylight viewing conditions, providing information about daytime stereoacuity, whereas less is known about nighttime stereoacuity and the relationship between them. In the current study, we designed two computerized stereopsis tasks to be conducted in low-illuminance conditions. We compared daytime and nighttime stereoacuity, as measured using a Functional Visual Analyzer (FVA), a clinical screening tool. The first task, which was modified from the FVA’s setting, required participants to detect which one of four circles was on a different depth plane. The second task required participants to determine whether a target line presented at varying depths was in front of or behind a comparison line on a fixed plane. For both tasks, stereoacuity was defined as the minimum binocular disparity at which a participant could perform the tasks. We recruited 53 participants aged 22–40 (M = 26.06 ± 4.28) with no ocular diseases and visual acuity better than 20/25. The FVA measures showed no significant difference between daytime and nighttime stereoacuity (M ± SD = 31.70 ± 16.73, 33.58 ± 27.86; t = −.538, p = .593), but they were positively correlated with each other (r = .433, p = .001). The thresholds measured in both tasks correlated significantly with nighttime stereoacuity (r = .323, p = .018; r = .300, p = .029), but only the first task correlated with daytime stereoacuity (r = .275, p = .046; r = .101, p = .470), indicating that the tasks conducted in the current setting were suitable for measuring nighttime stereoacuity. The results further indicate that the underlying mechanism for nighttime stereoacuity might differ from that of daytime stereoacuity and cannot be assessed using existing clinical screening tools.

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