February 2022
Volume 22, Issue 3
Open Access
Optica Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   February 2022
Contributed Session I: Adaptation to Prominent Monocular Metamorphopsia using Binocular Suppression
Author Affiliations
  • Nasif Zaman
    Department of Computer Science, University of Nevada, Reno, USA
  • Joshua Ong
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, United States
  • Alireza Tavakkoli
    Department of Computer Science, University of Nevada, Reno, USA
  • Stewart Zuckerbrod
    Houston Eye Associates, Houston, TX, USA
  • Michael Webster
    Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Reno, USA
Journal of Vision February 2022, Vol.22, 11. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.22.3.11
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      Nasif Zaman, Joshua Ong, Alireza Tavakkoli, Stewart Zuckerbrod, Michael Webster; Contributed Session I: Adaptation to Prominent Monocular Metamorphopsia using Binocular Suppression. Journal of Vision 2022;22(3):11. doi: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.22.3.11.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

45.1% of AMD patients perceive visual distortion or metamorphopsia in at least one of their eyes. These distortions pose severe impediment to reading, face recognition and visual search. Adaptation to these dysfunctions are generally preceded by development of significant visual loss. In this study we investigate how different levels of suppression accelerate this adaptation by simulating central, paracentral and cecocentral metamorphopsia monocularly, and then suppressing the resulting perception by overlaying a scotoma (completely black circle). Distortions with the same physical features are more noticeable when they are located centrally. Our results strongly confirm that binocular interactions allow for the complete suppression. Furthermore, we show that milder suppressions (50% area) takes considerably longer to adapt to, and the prominence of the scotoma remains relatively stable over time. The results further show that if the metamorphopsia is in the dominant eye, the effect of binocular compensation is diminished noticeably. Cecocentral metamorphopsia were generally adapted to with even mild suppression as their proximity to the physiological blind spot makes them particularly vulnerable to suppression.

Footnotes
 Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the national aeronautics and space administration under grant no. 80NSSC20K1831
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