August 2023
Volume 23, Issue 9
Open Access
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2023
Putting Memory back into Face Recognition: Aspects of Face Recollection Contribute to Deficits in Developmental Prosopagnosia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanvi Palsamudram
    Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
    Boston Attention and Learning Laboratory, Boston VA Healthcare Systems, Boston MA
  • Bar Yosef
  • Alison Campbell
    Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
    Boston Attention and Learning Laboratory, Boston VA Healthcare Systems, Boston MA
  • Regan Fry
    Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
    Boston Attention and Learning Laboratory, Boston VA Healthcare Systems, Boston MA
  • Mieke Verfaellie
    Memory Disorders Research Center, Boston VA Healthcare Systems, Boston MA
    Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston MA
  • Nicole Anderson
    Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Joseph DeGutis
    Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA
    Boston Attention and Learning Laboratory, Boston VA Healthcare Systems, Boston MA
  • Footnotes
    Acknowledgements  This work was supported by the R01 grant from the National Eye Institute (R01 EY032510-02)
Journal of Vision August 2023, Vol.23, 5911. doi:https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.23.9.5911
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      Tanvi Palsamudram, Bar Yosef, Alison Campbell, Regan Fry, Mieke Verfaellie, Nicole Anderson, Joseph DeGutis; Putting Memory back into Face Recognition: Aspects of Face Recollection Contribute to Deficits in Developmental Prosopagnosia. Journal of Vision 2023;23(9):5911. https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.23.9.5911.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Though face perception deficits in developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have been well described, face memory deficits in DP are relatively poorly characterized. We recently found that DPs have deficient face recollection memory, all-or-none retrieval of detailed information, but intact familiarity, feeling of knowing. In the current study, we had 45 DPs and 120 controls perform three face memory tasks to further characterize aspects of recollection: 1) An old/new task to infer recollection/familiarity from confidence ratings, 2) Face/scene task to examine face-scene associative memory and collect remember-know judgments and, 3) Face/name-occupation task to assess learning semantic associations with faces. Recollection scores from old/new ROC analysis and face/scene remember-know replicated that, compared to controls, DPs had deficient recollection (old/new p<0.001, d=0.92, face/scene p<0.001 d=0.57). In the face/scene task, DPs also had reduced scene accuracy for correct faces (p<0.001), suggesting deficits with recalling face-related contextual information. In the face/name-occupation task, DPs recalled fewer proper names than controls (p<0.001) but performed similarly in remembering occupations (p=0.56). Overall, DPs’ recollection deficits were weakly correlated with each other, suggesting that they may reflect distinct processes or are task specific. Notably, DPs also showed poorer familiarity than controls on the old/new (p=0.005 d=0.53) and face/scene tasks (p<0.001 d=0.67), but only recollection deficits remained significant after controlling for face perception abilities. Recollection measures from all three tasks together predicted 10.9% of unique variance in CFMT score independent of perception abilities and 29.4% of variance in DP diagnosis. Together, these results suggest that DPs may have multiple types of face recollection deficits or rather that their recollection deficits are task specific.

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